Category Archives: MG UK

Longbridge – What’s the point anymore?

By J.P.M Sandie

As much as those at MG Motor UK will deny it, the biggest story to come from them last year was the decision to end final assembly at Longbridge. Many words have been scribbled on the rights and wrongs of the decision so I’m not going to dwell on that here. My question for today is what is the point of their lingering presence at Longbridge?

The end of “production” meant MG no longer needed some of the buildings and consequently another parcel of the site has been returned to developer and landlord St. Modwen for redevelopment. However, MG will continue to inhabit a corner of the site which is subject to a 33 year lease (with a 6 month break clause), signed in 2006.
Although, as last year’s news shows, more of the site can easily be returned following negotiation. Still based there are the company owned Sales Centre, offices for MG Motor UK personnel and the SAIC Motor UK Technical Centre (SMTC).

SMTC is perhaps the most significant part of the lingering presence so we shall start there.

In some quarters SMTC is hyped up in terms of both involvement and size. The number of engineers is frequently exaggerated with 500 being an oft-quoted figure. However, the most recent set of accounts states the average headcount (including administrative support) for 2015 was actually 263. This number is inclusive of short-term contractors and in another part of the accounts average monthly staff numbers were stated as 153 (excluding contractors?). The 263 total was a drop of 24 from the 2014 accounts with SMTC citing difficulty in recruiting new engineers with the right skills as an explanation. One might suggest that falling staff numbers also indicates staff retention issues.

Since March 2009 SMTC has been based in one of the old admin blocks at Longbridge. As part of this they (SMTC is a separate entity to MG Motor UK) make a payment to MG to cover half the site costs. In the 2015 accounts this payment was £8million. Due to the size of even the remaining site Longbridge proves quite expensive in terms of costs. Moreover, St Modwen aren’t a charity and have no sentimental interest in automotive business being continued on the site so one can assume that the lease is at least at market value. Better value may be found with a new home.

The present base of the studio/engineering building is less than optimal in a number of ways. First of all, the building is fairly old and has merely been re-purposed rather than something tailored to the needs of the engineering and design teams. Secondly, the Midlands location sees SMTC having to compete with the success story that is Jaguar Land-Rover for staff. Tatuar have large facilities for design and engineering near Coventry at Gaydon and Whitley. This is probably a huge factor in the issues SMTC have had in recruiting and retaining staff. Suggestions have floated around that engineers have gone to SMTC to build experience before getting a job with Jaguar.

Moving to a new site holds advantages. First of all a new building could be tailored to the needs of the team more directly and have room for expansion as necessary. It would also allow SAIC to make a statement about their involvement in Britain. As things stand, their site is only subject to a lease which can be terminated at any time. In contrast, developing their own site would have a greater degree of permanence and be a vote of confidence in Britain. In turn, this will create more of a feel good factor about the business and that might just make recruiting easier. What investment there has been at SMTC is mostly on equipment that can easily move to new facilities.

Whilst moving to a new area may be too deep an uprooting for current staff there are plenty of new developments of business parks across the West Midlands. Indeed, due to the pollution on the site, the greatest likelihood is that the latest part of Longbridge to be handed over to the developers will probably become one itself. As an example, leading Chinese firm Changan have a small R&D facility at a recently built business park in Solihull.

As for MG Motor UK, there isn’t a strong case for them staying at Longbridge either. Management staff could be housed in office space elsewhere. Indeed, SAIC’s £30million investment on a building on Piccadilly bought six floors of it.

Currently the Piccadilly showroom is another part of the MG empire that, on the surface, makes little rational sense. It houses a showroom which doesn’t actually operate as a dealership. The real purpose seems to be advertising MG to passing Chinese tourists and make them believe the firm is big business in Britain. An idea no doubt dispelled by the lack of SAIC MGs on the roads within the M25 due to the non-existent dealer network in the area.

If this office space isn’t suitable or relocation is an issue for existing MG Motor UK staff there is no shortage of office space around Birmingham. Any economies MG Motor could make would generate a surplus that could be better spent bringing in new professionals to add fresh impetus or add to the pot for marketing important new products.

The Sales Centre may present fat worth trimming. Back in the early days of the MG re-launch the Elephant House could be seen as a pilgrimage for prospective customers as purchasing a car from the factory was attractive to the most enthusiastic enthusiasts. Now that there isn’t a factory and MG have one of their strongest geographic concentration of dealers in the Midlands region is there really a point? The location has also never been conducive to passing trade whilst there’s been a move towards “Motor Miles” where franchise sites cluster together and punters can easily kick tyres on a number of marques.

One now has to ponder the point of MG Motor UK still renting parts of the Longbridge site. At numerous times, MG UK has sought to distance itself from the products of ancestors who once occupied the site making any sentimental talk of a “historic home” seem hollow. Meanwhile, recent announcements have seen enthusiasts of legacy products become ever more hostile towards the new firm and their occupation of the site. Maybe a clean break and the chance to move on is required? Right now we have an engineering facility that could and perhaps better – considering facilities and staffing issues – be accommodated elsewhere. Any investment and move to owning rather than leasing land and premises could also be seen and spun as a vote of faith in and a strong link to the UK which might just improve the shaky view many have of the brand. That is of course assuming the almost temporary nature of the status quo doesn’t suit SAIC.

Buyer’s Guide – MG 3

By Barry

This is a buyer’s guide for the MG3 model. It is not a review or complete list of faults but is intended to be a general guide of what to look out for on a used MG3, something you can print off ad take with you to a viewing.

What is it?

The MG3 is a 5 door supermini from MG. It focuses on being good value and is marketed as having a sporty driving experience. It is currently available with one engine and gearbox combination, a 1.5 VTi-Tech 4 cylinder petrol engine generating 105bhp. This is mated to a 5-speed manual gearbox. There is no automatic gearbox currently offered in the UK. A small capacity turbo model is rumoured in the near future as the current engine required more than a remapping of the current engine to make it Euro 6 compatible. As of January 2017 sales seem to be dropping as it becomes comprehensively outclassed. In better news it’s selling well in Thailand.

Which model?

There are four models in the MG3 range, all are available with accessorise options.

MG3 3Time

The entry model MG3 3TIMEcosts £8399 and features a CD player with MP3 compatibility and Aux-in facility. It is also supplied with some very questionable plastic wheel trims.

MG3 3Form

 

The mid-range MG3 3FORM which is available from £9299. In addition to the standard specification it comes with air conditioning, DAB radio, Bluetooth and audio streaming, leather MG-design steering wheel with red stitching and steering wheel audio controls.

MG3 3Form Sport

The MG3 3FORM SPORT includes all the features of the mid-range 3FORM with the sports body styling pack and 16-inch Carousel alloy wheels at £9549.

 

 

MG 3 3Style

The final specification grade available is the range-topping MG3 3STYLE which is offered with 16-inch Diamond alloy wheel and a sports body styling pack that includes the rear boot spoiler and side sill extensions. Standard features include cruise control, automatic lights and windscreen wipers and reverse parking sensors, all for only £9999.

What should I look out for?

In general the MG3 is well built but it does come with some niggling faults. The following is a list of things buyers should watch out for and check.

Front LED ‘Hockey-stick’ lights: These can fail without warning. Usually one rather than both fail on new models. It doesn’t appear to affect all cars but it is worth checking that they have been replaced under warranty. Make sure there isn’t a colour difference between the two lights. They should be replaced in pairs to avoid this.

Clutch: Due to the failure of a small rubber seal near the bulkhead the clutch can appear to fail. Symptoms generally involve the clutch pedal going to the floor however it can be intermittent. This is easily rectified by dealers however not all appear to be aware of the fault which makes it difficult to identify the cause.

Sub frames: These have been known to be misaligned on new cars. This causes excessive tyre wear. It has also been known to cause a knocking noise in the front which can be hard to trace.

Brakes: Front brake pads can wear quickly due to poor quality pads being used. Discs appear to wear well. The rear brakes can suffer from a slight unbalance in braking due to iffy quality of the brake shoe linings, leading to rapid wear in the rear shoes on one side. A number of owners have reported that their cars have been in for wheel cylinder replacement due to seal failure. Check for leaks around the rear drums.

Door seals: These can leak and allow water in. They are replaced under warranty but the fix does not always work. Check for evidence of leaks.

Rear parking sensors: The sensors on the rear bumper are poorly weather sealed. This can leak to them staying on or not working at all in wet conditions. So far these have been fixed under warranty or by owners sealing them better. Either way, make sure they work.

Stereo: Some owners have reported issues with the radio, from not picking up reception, not turning off and not picking up Bluetooth devices. Again these seem to be rare but be aware they do happen.

Interior: There are a number of reports of ill-fitting trim on new cars however most dealers rectify this once it’s brought to their attention.

Warning lights: There are reports of cars showing erroneous warning lights including the engine warning light. Some require a dealer visit to reset them while others disappear themselves. While this doesn’t stop the car from functioning it has proved a great annoyance to owners and a head scratching issue to resolve for dealers. It has also been known to affect the fuel gauge leading it to give a false fuel level reading.

Over-Rev between 1st and 2nd gear: Some cars are known to suffer an over-rev between 1st and 2nd gear. This affects earlier cars and appears to have been cured on later cars. There are no ill effects from this other than it can cause annoyance to some owners. The fix for this being employed by owners is to stick a pound coin to the back of the clutch pedal (seriously this isn’t a joke). It cures the over-rev with no other issues.

British or Chinese built? There is a healthy debate whether the cars are British or Chinese built. While most of the assembly of cars takes place in China they are mostly finished in the old Longbridge factory however some MG3’s have been imported fully complete from China. This has been blamed on the fact the Longbridge plant cannot keep up with demand. Chinese built cars can be identified via the 11 digit VIN which will read “SDPZ1CBDADSxxxxxx” while Longbridge cars completed from CKD kits will read “SDPZ1CBDADDxxxxxx”.

Engine Issues: Reports are beginning to emerge from multiple owners of cam chain failure. Chains are slipping a cog and this leads to poor running and starting and will ultimately lead to engine failure. MG are slow to honour warranty repairs however this appears to be a localised dealership issue being caused by MG being slow to pay out on warranty claims. Always check the car starts easily and runs smoothly.

Overall:

Most owners appear to have positive experiences of the MG3 despite niggling faults. They report fuel efficiency of between 36-40mpg in general depending on usage conditions. Owners praise the nimble handling offered by the MG3, the low list price, high specification and graphics packs. However owners bemoan the amount of niggling faults hit and miss dealerships, poor backup, fuel economy and finally residuals.
It must be noted that the resolution of these niggling issues often depends on the dealership involved. Some are excellent and knowledgeable while others are not as willing to resolve issues in a timely manner.

This is simply a guide of all issues I have encountered on owners forums. It is not a complete and comprehensive list of faults. As with all used cars please ensure you run appropriate background checks and ensure all necessary servicing has been carried out.

Buyer’s Guide – MG 6

By Barry

This is a buyer’s guide for the MG6 model. It is not a review or complete list of faults but is intended to be a general guide of what to look out for on a used MG6, something you can print off and take with you to a viewing.

An MG6? What is it?

Well it’s rarer on British roads than a Ferrari, or so some people who haven’t bought one on various owner’s forums will tell you. Anyway, the MG6 is the first offering from the MG brand under the ownership of SAIC. It was initially available as a 5 door hatchback or a 4 door saloon known as the Magnette. It focuses on being good value and is marketed as having a sporty driving experience. Despite marketing material showing the hatchback as having a sunroof no such option was offered in Britain so don’t get your hopes up. At launch, it was available with one engine and gearbox combination, a 1.8 Turbo TCi-Tech 4 cylinder petrol engine generating 160bhp. The petrol engine and saloon variant were dropped from the range when the MG6 was facelifted in early 2015. MG sought to focus sales on the diesel variant was this was seen as the biggest potential seller according to MG, despite it never having outsold the petrol variant. The petrol engine was mated to a 5-speed manual gearbox while the 1.9L Turbo diesel was offered with a 6-speed gearbox. There was no automatic gearbox offered in the UK on any variant of the MG6. Non-compliance with Euro 6 emissions regulations finished new MG6 sales off from September 2016. It wasn’t missed by the market as sales have completely dried up meaning there were many zero mileage pre-reg models dumped on the market at the end further lowering used values.

Which model?

Three trim levels of the 1.8-litre turbocharged petrol MG6 were available from launch, S, SE and TSE with prices ranging from £15,495 to £18,995. TSE was the highest trim level available at launch and included leather interior and sat nav as standard.

MG 6 BTCC Edition

There was also a BTCC Edition which came with a higher level of specification in order to celebrate MG’s return to motorsport. MG tried one final time with a special edition in the form of the slow selling MG90 edition in order to celebrate 90 years of MG. This was offered in conjunction with a car giveaway however due to lacklustre sales the competition was cancelled when people began to ask when the draw was being held. Despite MG claiming to have sold all 90 cars they cancelled the competition due to lack of sales. Yes, we’re as confused as you are.
The MG6 received new trim levels when facelifted in early 2015. These new trim levels were S, TS and TL (a possible homage to the old Renault trim levels). TL was the range topping trim level and cames with a very high level of specification. The facelift range however was limited to the diesel engine only which benefited from improved efficiency levels. It also came with daylight running lights, new smaller alloys, poor colour choice and new bumpers. There was an improvement in interior trim quality and a substantial weight reduction. One announce for car buyers however with the facelift has been the removal of the rear wiper, small standard alloys and limited colour range.

What should I look out for?

The MG6 is the first offering from SAIC using the MG branding. As a first car developed mainly by SAIC it’s not a bad effort however the quality of the cars so far appears to be either hit or miss and certainly not improving with age. Some owners report no issues, some report niggling faults while others report multiple serious faults. The following is a list of things buyers should watch out for and check as these have been highlighted across owner’s forums. Some are very minor niggles, some only occur very rarely while others are reported regularly. It should be remembered that all cars from all manufacturers have faults; this list merely relates to the MG6 and is intended as a buyer’s aid.
Gearbox: It is not unknown for the gearbox in an MG6 to fail. This can happen at any mileage but it is generally preceded by a notchy change into gears, whining and popping out of gear. The finger of blame has been pointed in many directions however an improper filling of the gearbox oil during production is often blamed. While other owners have highlighted the quality of the box and the stresses it is under as major issues. Some owners have reported multiple gearbox failures. These have been replaced under warranty, up to 3 times in some cars. Other owners have reported no issues with the gearbox.
Early MG6s came with a poorly designed gear knob which owners claim makes the gearbox notchy to use. Later cars came with a better design and quality knob which generally cured the gearshift however not always. It’s worth ensuring you have the better design fitted in your car.

Clutch: Some owners have reported issues with the clutch failing on relatively new cars. Other owners have had no issue. The quality of the clutch plate and dual mass flywheel has been blamed by owners. Check for a recent clutch replacement in any prospective purchase and ensure there is no slipping on a test drive.

Coolant: Some owners have claimed that their cars have been supplied with incorrectly filled coolant leading to low coolant warnings. Other however have experienced issues with the coolant level warning sensor. These have been replaced under warranty by MG. Always check the coolant level on any prospective purchase.

Door seals: These can leak and allow water in. They are replaced under warranty but the fix does not always work. Check for evidence of leaks. Seals have also been known to fail on the boot so ensure that there are no leaks into the tyre well.

Rear parking sensors: The sensors on the rear bumper are poorly weather sealed. This can leak to them staying on or not working at all in wet conditions. So far these have been fixed under warranty or by owners sealing them better. Either way, make sure they work.

Stereo: Some owners have reported issues with the radio, from not picking up reception, not turning off and not picking up Bluetooth devices. These faults are more common than in the MG3.

Interior: There are a number of reports of ill-fitting trim on new cars however most dealers rectify this once it’s brought to their attention. As a general rule, the later the build date of the car the better the interior quality. It improved a lot over time.

Leather Seats: The leather seats have been praised for their comfort however some owners have reported issues with the quality of the leather used. This has included cracking/splitting of the leather, premature wear and stitching coming apart. Other owners have had no issue with the leather used. Some have also highlighted that the leather used is also of a poor quality. As usual check before you buy and ensure they are in good condition.

Key Fob: Ensure the key is in good condition and functioning properly. Owners have reported that keys are flimsy and break easily.

Warning lights: There are reports of cars showing erroneous warning lights including the engine warning light. Some require a dealer visit to reset them while others disappear themselves. While this doesn’t normally stop the car from functioning it has proved a great annoyance to owners and a head scratching issue to resolve for dealers. It has led to some owners being stranded also when cars refused to start.

Stop/Start: Owners of diesel cars have encountered issues from the stop/start system. Cars can refuse to start after shutting down. Other owners have blamed it for making the diesel cars easier to stall. It has left owners stranded.

Parts supply: Owners on many owner’s forums and Facebook support groups have reported issues with parts supply. This mainly seems to affect body panels, lights and gearboxes. Prospective owners should be aware that the diesel engine has been built and sold in limited numbers. This could lead to parts issues in the future. It’s generally accepted that the petrol model is a better bet for future parts supply.

Residuals: The MG6 does not hold its value well from new however this is excellent news for used car buyers. Dealers are willing to offer good deals on pre-reg models and used examples. Bargains can be had on used models direct from owners also. A 64 plate MG6 are trading in auctions for sub £2000 with low mileage so values are still falling but are soon to bottom out. Bargain hunters will soon be chasing these cars down.


Rental Cars:
MG sold a batch of 500 cars to Avis, many of these remained unsold when they were returned to MG and 18 months sitting unsold they were sold to Enterprise Rent a Car. Owners should be aware that these cars will have had a very hard life after a double stint on the rental market.

Private Hire cars: MG sold a large amount of cars into the private hire sector. Reports suggest these fared poorly with reliability and poor parts supply when they did fail keeping the cars off the road for far too long. Many firms are now selling these cars on having had enough. Make sure you don’t buy one.

Recalls: MG recalled MG6s for an electrical issue. Ensure this recall work has been done as previous to this a small number of MG6s suffered unexplained fires. Since the recall these fires have not happened however MG denies a link between the two.

Brakes: Front brake pads can wear quickly due to poor quality pads being used. Discs appear to wear well. Excessive front brake pad wear appears to have affected earlier cars, since the issue was highlight MG are sourcing their pads locally from ATB.

Door leaks:
Multiple reports of the inner plastic door seals behind the door cards not being affixed properly causing leaks into the cabin.

Light lenses:
Multiple reports emerging of plastic light covers beginning to crack, leak and discolour with age due to cheap plastics being used during manufacture. There are instances of MG covering this under warranty.

MG6 Facelift Model Only: If the door card is removed customers are reporting that plastic fixings must be broken to do this. These are not being replaced by MG. When reinstalled they have a tendency to rattle and squeak. This issue does not affect the pre-facelift model.

Overall:

Some owners have had very positive experiences of the MG6 however many others have experienced issues, some more than others. They report fuel efficiency of between 35-39mpg in general depending on usage conditions for petrol models and 50-55pg for diesel models. Owners praise the good handling offered by the MG6, good interior space, high specification and value for money.However owners bemoan the amount of niggling faults hit and miss dealerships, poor backup, fuel economy and finally residuals.
It must be noted that the resolution of these niggling issues often depends on the dealership involved. Some are excellent and knowledgeable while others are not as willing to resolve issues in a timely manner. Other owners have reported mixed results from MG in resolving issues when they become larger.
This is simply a guide of all issues I have encountered on owners forums. It is not a complete and comprehensive list of faults. As with all used cars please ensure you run appropriate background checks and ensure all necessary servicing has been carried out.

Will MG UK finally get it right with the ZS?

By JPM Sandie

SAIC’s attempts to re-establish the MG brand in the UK have had more false starts than a sports day at a special school and late 2017 will see yet another attempt in the new ZS B-Segment Crossover recently unveiled in China. I actually think this has the potential (and I’ll be using that word a lot) to make a bigger impact. As a note, the moniker for the UK market version has yet to be decided and likely won’t be ZS, but we will use this name for convenience.

The first thing that strikes you – or maybe doesn’t strike you – is the styling. It’s actually relatively handsome by the standards of a small SUV.

However, the longer you look at it the more you start to recognise a Mazda-esque front, a Nissan Qashqai like side profile and a rear end reminiscent of the Renault Kadjar (- or even Hyundai overtones -Ed).

Mazda CX3, Nissan Qashqai & Renault Kadjar

In a country that still offers carbon copies like the Landwind X7 and the Zotye SR9 perhaps the surprise is that MG were as original as they were. Maybe designers for minor Chinese brands lack the confidence to design something fully original and develop a cohesive brand identity?
So it’s a decent looking car but not a hugely original design or something that screams MG to you. It bears little resemblance to the rest of the present MG lineup with its siblings lacking the large grille. The GS has been facelifted for the Chinese market recently – since the ZS was unveiled – but that has now gone in another different direction. Not great for a brand that is struggling to develop a strong identity.

Moving inside, the design is far more cohesive than what we’ve seen in the 3, 6 and GS. Gone are awkward and unattractive details like dials or screens that are in cut-outs that are too big or the wrong shape.
I’m not convinced about the hoods around the instrument binnacles but there’s less wrong at first glance than with previous SAIC MG interiors. Depending on your point of view the coloured seat inserts are either a tasteful homage to the early MG Z cars (like the original ZS) or, perhaps more likely, a sheer coincidence. Chinese specification cars are also available with a large panoramic sunroof stretching 0.83 cubic metres

Other improvements can be found under the bonnet. The Chinese market ZS come with a choice of two engines. A basic 1.5 petrol – similar to the one fitted to the MG3 – is the entry point to the range. By now this is putting out 120BHP (against 105BHP in the 3) and 150NM of torque. This engine has already proved somewhat lacking in service in the MG3 feeling weaker than the figures suggest.

3-Cylinder GM SGE unit

Also available is a 1.0 3 cylinder Turbo engine with 125BHP and 170NM of torque. This is the engine fitted to many of the test mules being spotted by the eagle eyed on Britain’s roads so is almost certainly one we will get. In China it will be available with a six speed manual gearbox or a Dual Clutch auto and will, confusingly, be badged “16T”.

The 1.0 SGE (Small Gasoline Engine) is shared with General Motors and already sees service in Vauxhall’s Adam, Corsa and Astra. It has been very well received due to its strong levels of refinement for a triple and more than respectable economy and emissions figures. A world away from the old-fashioned “VTI-Tech” unit in the 3 then.

So based on a study of the images and technical specifications it’s a case of so far so good. It seems that the ZS may address some of the largest criticisms of previous MG products, but will it succeed on the UK car market?

MG 6 & MG 3 ’90th Anniversary LE’ models

Amongst previous MG products, we have seen a massive flop in the MG6 (poor engine range, poor marketing and targeted a declining sector), a qualified success in the MG3 (well priced but an underwhelming engine and a strong feeling it could do better with stronger promotion) and the still very discrete GS which has only made just over 500 registration in 6 months on sale. The GS has been undermined by a

Better Late Than Never? Perhaps not.

limited engine range (petrol only in the strongly diesel dominated mid-sized crossover market) and a baffling advertising campaign.

Nissan Juke & Vauxhall Mokka both sell well as petrol models.a petrol with petrol versions of the Juke and Mokka being relatively common.

The ZS won’t suffer as badly here as whilst the lack of a diesel may prevent the GS from being anything other than a niche offering, buyers of small crossovers are far happier to buy
an efficient petrol engine like the 1.0 Turbo is far nearer the sector bullseye than the engine of any previous MG offering.

After the MG6 and GS that aimed at the periphery of sectors MG dealers will no doubt be glad of another core vehicle that can be a decent seller (at least by the standards they have come to expect). MG have ambitious plans to be selling 20,000 cars in Britain by five years time and one would expect this to be driven almost entirely by the ZS and MG3. Market analysts have pinpointed B-segment crossovers as the fastest growing segment on the British new car market and MG will be joining the party only moderately late, unlike with the GS where they were about as timely as they were with last year’s accounts.

However, there are two things that need to be right before the ZS can help towards MG’s ambitious targets, excel for the long suffering dealer network and tempt new traders into filling open points.

First key consideration is price. MG got things spectacularly right with the MG3 where the entire model range came in beneath a headline figure of £10,000.

Sub-£10k price strategy was a rare win for MG UK with the MG 3

The ZS needs to have a price range that is similarly compelling in comparison to key competitors. Even at list price, the MG3 is a genuinely cheap car whilst the 6 and GS have been priced at points where a smaller or less well specified car from a rival has appeared a more compelling option.

SsangYong’s Tivoli, which will be one of the main competitors for the ZS, comes in at £12,950. A well-specified Dacia Duster with a Turbo Petrol engine is yours for around the same. The ZS cannot seriously expect to succeed if it is significantly more expensive than either of these competitors.

ZS must be priced keenly amongst it’s rivals to stand a chance.

There simply isn’t the room to as the sector leading Nissan Juke costs from £14,320 and the popular Renault Captur starts at just under £15,000.

The other thing that must be right for the ZS to perform well is the marketing. This has been a failing for MGUK thus far with

The SsangYong Tivoli will oppose the ZS strongly – and is already becoming established.

their marketing either being non existent or downright strange. It will require more than an advert that tells you more about a pizza with an underwhelming topping than the car. We’re not holding our breath on that one and it would be typical for the British marketing team to shoot themselves in the foot where the Chinese engineers and planners may have finally given them something with the attributes to succeed.

And there’s the rub. The current management of MG UK have proven themselves to be nothing better than an absolute shower. Incapable of organizing a session in a brewery and lacking the marketing skills to promote even the most successful of hot cake concerns they provide a dense, self congratulating elephant in the room. The only things they have succeeded at is making themselves a joke in the industry, motoring press and trade whilst somehow alienating some of the most dedicated fanboy customers through a combination of dreadful customer care and general incompetence. The ZS has the potential to succeed but unless something radical changes with the company or someone stumbles upon a clue in one of the buildings St. Modwen are about to pull down it will be a struggle.

Whatever happens Macdroitwich will continue to follow the “ZS” story up to and following its launch.

A Refulgent New Dawn

MacDroitwich blogs are back!

We can’t promise that any content will be exciting, we can’t promise it will be on time, but what we can promise is that as the last bastion of truth for the Firm and MG related news, we will be there for you, reporting information – without censorship, as we receive it from our far-reaching team.

You can look forward to real-world experiences from enthusiasts, owners, factory workers, members of the motor trade and the associated press, together with in-depth analysis into what’s going on at MG today.

There’ll be articles on vehicles from our heritage by our panel of regular contributors, along with essays from our experts.

The refulgence is gaining pace. Don’t be stupid enough to be anywhere else.